In response to President Biden’s announcement that Jessica Rosenworcel will be the acting chair of the Federal Communications Commission, Anna Maria Chávez, Executive Director and CEO of the National School Boards Association (NSBA), issued the following statement:

“We are delighted by President Biden’s choice of Jessica Rosenworcel as Chair of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). Rosenworcel has long been a champion for closing the digital divide, advocating on behalf of the millions of students left behind because of inadequate internet access.

“In her current role at the FCC, Rosenworcel has led the charge for expanding the E-Rate program, a federal technology service bringing internet access to schools and libraries at a discounted rate. But most importantly, she has initiated a national conversation around the ‘homework gap,’ a term she coined to shine light on how the digital divide spawns further inequity in education.

“Closing the homework gap is a priority we share. Like Rosenworcel, we have seen how the homework gap has grown during the pandemic as many schools moved online and demands on broadband grew exponentially. That’s why NSBA has been advocating for $12 billion to help schools and school districts through the pandemic. Additionally, we believe any infrastructure package should include a long-term and permanent investment to boost the nation’s broadband.

“Rosenworcel addressed hundreds of our members at our annual Advocacy Institute in Washington, D.C. just last year, and we are confident she will use her voice as chair to address educational disparities and speak in defense of our 50 million public schoolchildren.

“We congratulate Jessica Rosenworcel on her new role and we are eager to work with her as she guides the FCC in defending fair and equitable access to education for our nation’s students."

Around NSBA

a boy being tutored at a desk

Black Students in the Condition of Education 2020

The Center for Public Education selected relevant data from the Condition of Education to help school leaders not only monitor the educational progress of Black students, but also rethink what public schools can do better for Black students.