Center for Public Education

Nonfiction reading is getting a bum rap, writes CPE director Barth in Huff Post

Patte Barth, director of the Center for Public Education (CPE) at the National School Boards Association speaks out about the significance of nonfiction reading in her recent blog for Huffington Post.

“Developing students' skill at reading for information is equally important to reading and analyzing novels, drama and poetry,” says Barth. “The ability to comprehend and analyze informational texts plays a key role in equipping students for college, work and day-to-day life.”

NSBA’s Center for Public Education report examines the important role of informational reading

A new report, Beyond Fiction: The Importance of Reading for Information, released today by the National School Boards Association’s (NSBA's) Center for Public Education (CPE), examines the key role of informational reading in preparing students for college, the workplace, and day-to-day life.

CPE arrived at several conclusions in its report:

New Report from NSBA’s Center for Public Education Calls on Schools to Emphasize Nonfiction Reading Alongside Literature

Alexandria, Va. (Oct. 15, 2014) – A new report released today by the National School Boards Association’s (NSBA) Center for Public Education (CPE), examines the key role of informational reading in preparing students for college, the workplace, and day-to-day life. While U.S. students overall are good readers of literature, CPE’s analysis shows that their performance drops dramatically when tasked with reading non-literary texts.

CPE's Patte Barth on PBS NewsHour: reading more makes a difference

Patte Barth, Director of the Center for Public Education at the National School Boards Association, discusses the development of reading skills during her recent interview with Hari Sreenivasan of PBS NewsHour. Barth speaks about the importance of reading at grade level and how extending reading time and instruction makes a difference for all students.

Watch the full interview!

NSBA’s Center for Public Education report finds few high school graduates don’t go on to college

NSBA’s Center for Public Education Report Finds Few High School Graduates Don’t Go on to College

Alexandria, Va. (Sept. 29, 2014) – In a new report, The Path Least Taken: A Quest to Learn More About High School Graduates Who don’t Go on to College, the National School Boards Association’s (NSBA), Center for Public Education (CPE) shifts the discussion about college and career readiness from graduates who go to college after high school, toward non college-goers. CPE’s analysis shows the non college-going group to be much smaller than previously thought--only 21 percent of high school graduates don’t proceed to a two- or four- year college by age 20 and by age 26 that percentage reduces to 12.

Video: Is public education worth the cost?

What’s a public education worth? Can we quantify the value of education?

A new animated video from the National School Boards Association’s Center for Public Education does just that.

Intended for a broad audience, “Is It Worth It?” graphically shows the value education adds to American society.

What are our states being graded on this time?

New NSBA’s Center for Public Education Report Shows Mayor-School Board Collaboration Strengthens School Governance

CPE names “10 Good Things About Public Education”

Can you name 10 good things about public education?

Patte Barth, director of NSBA’s Center for Public Education, recently wrote about the many successes in public education for American School Board Journal, and she also gave her suggestions for ways schools can improve.

For instance, she notes, fourth-graders have improved their reading skills by six points on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) over the past decade.

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