NSBA Lauds PDK/Gallup Public Poll Findings that Value Local Public Schools and Resist Vouchers

(Alexandria, Va. – August 23, 2015) In its advance review of the newly-released 47th Annual PDK/Gallup Poll of the Public’s Attitudes Toward the Public Schools, the National School Boards Association (NSBA) is pleased to find strong public support for local governance, resistance to vouchers, and high marks for local schools.

This year’s PDK/Gallup Poll is titled “Testing Doesn’t Measure Up for Americans.” In addition to garnering public opinion on standardized testing, the poll explores an array of education “hot topics,” including Common Core, school choice, school performance, school funding, vaccinations, and more. New to this year’s poll, data are reported by specific population sectors, including public school parents, political party affiliation, and race (white, black, and Hispanic).

“For the 10th consecutive year, Americans named lack of financial support as the biggest problem facing their local schools,” said Thomas J. Gentzel, Executive Director, National School Boards Association. “ESEA reauthorization offers an opportunity to ensure that every public school district is adequately funded and able to support high-quality teaching and learning.”

How-to Video: Logging Into the NSBA/COSA Website

Here’s how to log on to the NSBA site to access COSA members-only content.

New Report from NSBA’s Center for Public Education Calls on Schools to Emphasize Nonfiction Reading Alongside Literature

Alexandria, Va. (Oct. 15, 2014) – A new report released today by the National School Boards Association’s (NSBA) Center for Public Education (CPE), examines the key role of informational reading in preparing students for college, the workplace, and day-to-day life. While U.S. students overall are good readers of literature, CPE’s analysis shows that their performance drops dramatically when tasked with reading non-literary texts.

PDK/Gallup Poll Reflects Americans’ Support for School Board Governance

Subscribe to RSS - Research
Go to top